Suffering and Sustenance: Mindful ways to resolve the paradox

Ronna Kabatznick, Ph.D

Suffering is part of our daily existence yet through habit, we constantly push the unpleasant feelings away by seeking comfort in food. We seek sustenance, but in fact, the feeling of satisfaction, and the comfort that arises from it, is fleeting. It actually cannot be sustained. So what we consider both suffering and sustenance are actually part of each other. Within the experience of sustenance lies the feeling of suffering. And within suffering is also the possibility of sustenance.

How to Improve Your Mindful Eating Teacher Competencies

Lynn Rossy, Ph.D., Caroline Baerten, RD

This Round Table Discussion with Board Members of TCME will address important information for deepening your mindfulness practice and honing your skills as a mindful eating teacher. We will be discussing the Good Practice Guidelines and the new and exciting programs that TCME will be offering to support you over the coming year. The guidelines are meant to be an encouragement and inspiration. The new programs are intended to increase your exposure to the latest research in the field and give you a greater understanding of the underlying teachings of mindfulness. We will also be asking for your suggestions on what TCME could do that would be most helpful for you as mindful eating teachers.

Mindful Eating as a Spiritual Practice

Caroline Baerten, RD

When what has been given to us is no longer taken for granted, then eating becomes a spiritual practice. During this presentation, we will learn a variety of ways to cultivate mindful reverence in our relationship with food.

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